Australian Professor says to keep people poor so they don’t mess up the U.N.’s “Sustainable Development” dream!

Posted: March 21, 2013 in Uncategorized

Another Green Eco-whacko who is advocating that by helping poor people out of poverty will “kill the planet” is given space in the U.K.’s Guardian to spout his hateful ideas and suggest that for this planet to become sustainable that Governments should NOT help poor people live better!

How’s that for a nice warm and fuzzy wish for your fellow humans?

But then people like this consider themselves superior to the normal foot dragging human element, don’t they?

This guy straight from the disgraced U.N.’s IPCC is about as charismatic as a road kill.

Here’s his pitch in all it’s Green Hatefulness!

Enviro frets in Nature mag: ‘Poverty alleviation could undermine’ sustainable development

Reminds me of the infamous enviro sentiment concerning the use of DDT to control malaria in Africa: The poor are “better off dead than riotously reproducing.”

From The Guardian:

Prof David Griggs, director of the Monash Sustainability Institute in Australia, argues in an article in the journal Nature that it is no longer enough for countries to solely pursue the poverty alleviation targets enshrined in the millennium development goals (MDG) that were agreed in 2000 but run out in 2015.

“Humans are transforming the planet in ways that could undermine any development gains. Mounting research shows that the stable functioning of Earth systems – including the atmosphere, oceans, forests, waterways, biodiversity and biogeochemical cycles – is a prerequisite for a thriving global society,” he writes, with colleagues.

READ MORE HERE:

 

Nations urged to combine environmental and development goals

 

damian blog : pollution in China

Humans are transforming the planet in ways that could undermine any development gains,’ the paper warns. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

Degradation of the natural world is undermining efforts to reduce poverty, warn scientists, who say the only chance of achieving global prosperity is for all countries to combine poverty and environmental targets.

World leaders should set six goals around universal clean energy, an end to water and food shortages, thriving lives and livelihoods, and healthy and productive ecosystems, they say.

Prof David Griggs, director of the Monash Sustainability Institute in Australia, argues in an article in the journal Nature that it is no longer enough for countries to solely pursue the poverty alleviation targets enshrined in the millennium development goals (MDG) that were agreed in 2000 but run out in 2015.

“Humans are transforming the planet in ways that could undermine any development gains. Mounting research shows that the stable functioning of Earth systems – including the atmosphere, oceans, forests, waterways, biodiversity and biogeochemical cycles – is a prerequisite for a thriving global society,” he writes, with colleagues.

Instead, the authors say that the old goals should be combined with global environmental targets drawn from science and from existing international agreements to create new “sustainable development goals” (SDGs).

“Pursuing a post-2015 agenda [which is] focused only on poverty alleviation could undermine the agenda’s purpose. Growing evidence and real-world changes convincingly show that humanity is driving global environmental change and has pushed us into a new geological epoch. Further human pressure risks causing widespread, abrupt and possibly irreversible changes to basic Earth-system processes. Water shortages, extreme weather, deteriorating conditions for food production, ecosystem loss, ocean acidification and sea-level rise are real dangers that could threaten development and trigger humanitarian crises across the globe,” say the authors.

Countries began the political process of adopting new post-2015 targets earlier this month at the inaugural meeting of the open working group on sustainable development goals at the UN headquarters in New York. Most developing countries argued, as they have done throughout the long-running UN climate negotiations, that rich countries should do more than developing countries to alleviate environmental pressures on the basis that they have been largely responsible for the problems and have greater resources to tackle them. However, developed countries want to see ecological improvements included as an overarching priority in the future goals of developing nations.

The scientists’ hopes rests on countries combining existing, agreed UN targets and adopting a new definition of sustainable development. It is presently defined as: “Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” They propose: “Development that meets the needs of the present while safeguarding Earth’s life-support system, on which the welfare of current and future generations depends.”

READ MORE HERE:

 

Bio on:Prof David Griggs, director of the Monash Sustainability Institute in Australia

Professor Dave Griggs

Director, MSI & CEO, ClimateWorks Australia

Office location: MSI, Building 74, Clayton
Telephone: +61 3 9905 9323
Email: dave.griggs@monash.edu

Professor Dave Griggs

Bio

In September 2007 Dave moved to Australia to become Director of the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI) which aims to deliver solutions to key sustainability challenges. In November 2008 he also became CEO of the newly created organisation ClimateWorks Australia (CWA), focussed on action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Previous positions he has held include UK Met Office Deputy Chief Scientist, Director of the Hadley Centre for Climate Change, and Head of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scientific assessment unit.

Dave is a past vice-chair of the World Climate Research Programme and member of the Victorian Ministerial Reference Council on Climate Change Adaptation. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE), a member of the Australian Council of Environmental Deans and Directors and the Climate Institute Strategic Council. Dave was awarded the Vilho Vaisala award (World Meteorological Organization) in 1992.

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