Our own Electricity Operator states that Wind and Solar policy in Ontario will cost consumers over $200 million more per year if not changed!

Posted: February 26, 2013 in Uncategorized

The Green Energy Fraudulent Scam which has been forced down Ontario consumers throats is starting to be exposed for what it really is. WRONG!

When our own Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) states: “if it can’t control the flow of wind and solar power onto the Ontario grid, then “reliable and economic operation of the power system is, at best, highly compromised and likely not feasible.”…….then things don’t add up when we hear the  claims that Wind is cheap, free and clean and will create jobs and is good for Ontario!

Even worse, this Government has plans to triple the number of Wind Turbines in Ontario within 3 years!

Of course the Wind Companies are crying foul because any changes in the policy regarding Green Energy would cost them billions of $$$ of consumer’s payments!

End this FRAUD now and stop this Green Madness!……………

Surplus wind power could cost Ontario ratepayers up to $200 million: IESO

Surplus wind power could cost Ontario ratepayers millions and compromise power system, says electricity system operator. It says renewable energy market rules must change
 Business reporter, Published on Tue Feb 26 2013

Coping with surplus wind power will cost Ontario electricity ratepayers up to $200 million a year if market rules don’t change, says the power system operator.

Moreover, it says, if it can’t control the flow of wind and solar power onto the Ontario grid, then “reliable and economic operation of the power system is, at best, highly compromised and likely not feasible.”

The Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) makes the statements in a filing with the Ontario Energy Board.

It is responding to complaints from big wind power companies that the IESO’s proposals to impose new market rules on wind and solar power will cost them millions in lost revenue.

The dispute comes as more and more renewable power is about to flow onto the province’s power grid.

About 2,700 megawatts of wind and solar power are currently feeding electricity into Ontario’s system, three-quarters of it wind. That amount is set to more than triple by January, 2016.

Solar power generally flows into the system when it’s most needed, when demand for power is high.

But wind often blows at the wrong time — overnight when demand, or “load” on the system is low — and dies when demand is high.

“It is not unusual for the wind to fall off in the morning at the same time as the morning load picks up,” says the IESO.

At present, the IESO can’t control the flow of wind and solar onto the system in the same way it can control the output of other generators. It all flows onto the grid, and is paid a fixed price.

When there’s more power than the system can handle, the IESO sells it to neighbouring provinces and states — sometimes at a loss, and sometimes actually paying them to take it.

Those losses are absorbed by ratepayers, and added to the electricity bill as the “global adjustment,” which now often exceeds the price of energy by a wide margin.

So far this month, for example, the market price for power has averaged 2.96 cents a kilowatt hour. The global adjustment has been 5.73 cents a kwh. Consumers pay delivery and debt.

Another strategy is to close down a nuclear unit. But nuclear units can’t be re-started in a hurry; it takes a couple of days. During that time, demand can rebound, forcing the IESO to buy more power from gas-fired plants.

READ MORE HERE:

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Comments
  1. Really, who work those contracts ??, i.e. guarantee that OPA/IESO/Ontario will take production, if needed or not. Yikes !!!

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